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Michigan Psychoanalytic Institute & Society

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Member of the Community: Psychoanalysis and Activism

Jane Hassinger, L.C.S.W., D.C.S.W.
Graduate, University of Michigan and the Center for Contemporary Psychoanalysis (New York City)

Discussant: Robin Rayford, M.A.
Graduate, Michigan Psychoanalytic Institute

Saturday, December 3, 2016
2:00 – 4:00 PM
*2 CME and CE Credit Hours

NOTE LOCATION: Depression Center Auditorium, Rachel Upjohn Building, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor (1 mile east of US-23, on SE corner of Plymouth and Earhart Road, on U-M’s E. Medical Campus. Enter via back or south door)

About the presenter:
Jane Hassinger, L.C.S.W., D.C.S.W., is a clinical social worker and psychoanalyst, and a graduate of the University of Michigan and the Center for Contemporary Psychoanalysis in NYC. She is in private practice in Ann Arbor and also has a research appointment at the UM's Institute of Research on Women and Gender. Jane taught at UM's School of Social Work and Departments of Psychology, and Women's Studies for 25 years. Her teaching and research have emphasized interdisciplinary/international perspectives on and interventions for women's mental and reproductive health. Her current project, Providers Share, explores the experiences of teams of abortion providers from around the world.

Practice Gap/Need and Course Description:
Often, physicians and therapists are unaware that psychoanalytic ideas are powerful and helpful in dealing with social, environmental, and political traumas and catastrophes as they affect our patients and communities. This presentation discusses the identification of the types of situations outside the consulting room where psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic therapists can be helpful. The program also discusses how therapists and analysts can utilize psychoanalytic thought in these situations.

After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:
1. Identify situations outside the consulting room where psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic therapists can be helpful.
2. Identify how therapists and analysts can utilize psychoanalytic thought in the above mentioned situations.
3. Describe how to utilize psychoanalytic ideas outside the consulting room, to effect social change and healing.